Logo design for an ipad app that I’m working on far Bar Managers… maybe?

Logo design for an ipad app that I’m working on far Bar Managers… maybe?

You know how everyone jokes/complains about “White-washing” actresses in movies and things like that?
Well, this is pretty much what every picture of me and my boyfriend looks like. HOLY GOD WE NEED TO GET OUT INTO THE SUNLIGHT

You know how everyone jokes/complains about “White-washing” actresses in movies and things like that?

Well, this is pretty much what every picture of me and my boyfriend looks like. HOLY GOD WE NEED TO GET OUT INTO THE SUNLIGHT

That moment when you’ve been up nearly all night and woke up to drink down the rest of your energy drink, only to realize that you feel like your fingers and mouth are going a million miles a second… and there’s nobody in the room you’re talking to

I know I put a lot of derpy armor designs, and am constantly reworking them, but for the graphic novel I’ve (yet again) redesigned the armor-type that I want for one of the character (Matthew Jane) to be more fitting to his position and office.
The one in black is the final armor design for Matthew Jane, for he is a captain of a troupe and while I used to like his previous design. The old one appeared to be more for an average soldier, while the new one is very clearly for a well-equipped captain. Also, even though he is a 5th son of a noble (and has supposedly gone his own way to join the church) he’s probably still granted some special privilege due to his station—at least in terms of his equipment.
More sketches to come tonight whilst my roommate and I watch Bambi 2 and Fox and the Hound.
(I’m totally expecting to do animal versions of all my characters, because why not?)

I know I put a lot of derpy armor designs, and am constantly reworking them, but for the graphic novel I’ve (yet again) redesigned the armor-type that I want for one of the character (Matthew Jane) to be more fitting to his position and office.

The one in black is the final armor design for Matthew Jane, for he is a captain of a troupe and while I used to like his previous design. The old one appeared to be more for an average soldier, while the new one is very clearly for a well-equipped captain. Also, even though he is a 5th son of a noble (and has supposedly gone his own way to join the church) he’s probably still granted some special privilege due to his station—at least in terms of his equipment.

More sketches to come tonight whilst my roommate and I watch Bambi 2 and Fox and the Hound.

(I’m totally expecting to do animal versions of all my characters, because why not?)

Working on some wireframes. The Main navigation isn’t finished yet, but I think I’m at least happy with this page :)

Working on some wireframes. The Main navigation isn’t finished yet, but I think I’m at least happy with this page :)

Some expressions Drawings which I may or may not digitally “ink” for the character design. 
Eventually I’ll be finished with this stuff, and move on to the other two characters, but I have so much work to do anyway that 10 pages per character is freaking awful!

Some expressions Drawings which I may or may not digitally “ink” for the character design. 

Eventually I’ll be finished with this stuff, and move on to the other two characters, but I have so much work to do anyway that 10 pages per character is freaking awful!

Character creation exercise

During graphic novel we had an exercise in character creation. The class shouted out 5 different animals, 5 different jobs, and 5 different time periods. You choose one from each column and draw a character in three steps; you draw examples of the animal for reference, draw them in their job, and then draw them in their time period.

I chose the warthog, truck driver.

So this is Hamish, my warthog truck driver who dreams of being a singer one day and practices in the truck and sings at late night pubs during his stops.

Character creation exercise

During graphic novel we had an exercise in character creation. The class shouted out 5 different animals, 5 different jobs, and 5 different time periods. You choose one from each column and draw a character in three steps; you draw examples of the animal for reference, draw them in their job, and then draw them in their time period.

I chose the warthog, truck driver.

So this is Hamish, my warthog truck driver who dreams of being a singer one day and practices in the truck and sings at late night pubs during his stops.

Character Concept art
We’re supposed to do 10 pages of sketches in our sketchbook for each character for the graphic novel. Considering I’ve done years of sketches for this guy, I have decided to make a deck* for him instead (*Deck is like documentation for work).
I had dug through the memory vaults as well as some super old sketches (and all of the inspirational character designs) to come up with the various versions that this character has gone through over the course of the many years.
Naturally, he’s been between Pirate designs, D&D Thief designs, and everything in between.
Also, fuck hats. Hats are hell to draw.
Zoom Info
Character Concept art
We’re supposed to do 10 pages of sketches in our sketchbook for each character for the graphic novel. Considering I’ve done years of sketches for this guy, I have decided to make a deck* for him instead (*Deck is like documentation for work).
I had dug through the memory vaults as well as some super old sketches (and all of the inspirational character designs) to come up with the various versions that this character has gone through over the course of the many years.
Naturally, he’s been between Pirate designs, D&D Thief designs, and everything in between.
Also, fuck hats. Hats are hell to draw.
Zoom Info

Character Concept art

We’re supposed to do 10 pages of sketches in our sketchbook for each character for the graphic novel. Considering I’ve done years of sketches for this guy, I have decided to make a deck* for him instead (*Deck is like documentation for work).

I had dug through the memory vaults as well as some super old sketches (and all of the inspirational character designs) to come up with the various versions that this character has gone through over the course of the many years.

Naturally, he’s been between Pirate designs, D&D Thief designs, and everything in between.

Also, fuck hats. Hats are hell to draw.

New Goal!

So my new goal (despite it not being New Year’s) is to get a post up every day.

What will the post be? Most likely sketches, some WIPS from my design work, or even some pictures of my work space. Something, really, so I can start posting on a regular basis rather than ignoring my tumblr for weeks on end (whoops.)

I also considered deleting all previous posts in the effort of “starting over” with my tumblr, but I’ll leave that up to you guys. Send me an Ask with what you think about deleting things, or if I should just leave it alone.
I’ve also considered looking into making an “old” and a “current” blog and moving all of the previous stuff to the old one, deleting them from this one, and starting my daily posting again :)

So let me know!

art-of-swords:

Combination of Dagger and Wheellock Pistol
Dated: circa 1575–1600
Culture: German
Place of Origin: possibly Saxony
Medium: steel, wood
Measurements: L. 18 15/16 in. (48.1 cm); L. of blade 13 13/16 in. (35.1 cm); L. of blade (without tip) 11 11/16 in. (29.7 cm); L. of quillons 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm); Cal. .29 in. (7.4 mm); Wt. 1 lb. 11 oz. (765.4 g)
Combination weapons usually were made as technical novelties and showpieces and therefore, often are highly decorated. The finely etched strapwork pattern on this example also is found on the best German firearms, edged weapons, and armor of the late sixteenth century. Before firing this dagger-pistol, the tip of the blade had to be removed, revealing the muzzle of the gun barrel.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Zoom Info
art-of-swords:

Combination of Dagger and Wheellock Pistol
Dated: circa 1575–1600
Culture: German
Place of Origin: possibly Saxony
Medium: steel, wood
Measurements: L. 18 15/16 in. (48.1 cm); L. of blade 13 13/16 in. (35.1 cm); L. of blade (without tip) 11 11/16 in. (29.7 cm); L. of quillons 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm); Cal. .29 in. (7.4 mm); Wt. 1 lb. 11 oz. (765.4 g)
Combination weapons usually were made as technical novelties and showpieces and therefore, often are highly decorated. The finely etched strapwork pattern on this example also is found on the best German firearms, edged weapons, and armor of the late sixteenth century. Before firing this dagger-pistol, the tip of the blade had to be removed, revealing the muzzle of the gun barrel.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Zoom Info
art-of-swords:

Combination of Dagger and Wheellock Pistol
Dated: circa 1575–1600
Culture: German
Place of Origin: possibly Saxony
Medium: steel, wood
Measurements: L. 18 15/16 in. (48.1 cm); L. of blade 13 13/16 in. (35.1 cm); L. of blade (without tip) 11 11/16 in. (29.7 cm); L. of quillons 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm); Cal. .29 in. (7.4 mm); Wt. 1 lb. 11 oz. (765.4 g)
Combination weapons usually were made as technical novelties and showpieces and therefore, often are highly decorated. The finely etched strapwork pattern on this example also is found on the best German firearms, edged weapons, and armor of the late sixteenth century. Before firing this dagger-pistol, the tip of the blade had to be removed, revealing the muzzle of the gun barrel.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Zoom Info
art-of-swords:

Combination of Dagger and Wheellock Pistol
Dated: circa 1575–1600
Culture: German
Place of Origin: possibly Saxony
Medium: steel, wood
Measurements: L. 18 15/16 in. (48.1 cm); L. of blade 13 13/16 in. (35.1 cm); L. of blade (without tip) 11 11/16 in. (29.7 cm); L. of quillons 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm); Cal. .29 in. (7.4 mm); Wt. 1 lb. 11 oz. (765.4 g)
Combination weapons usually were made as technical novelties and showpieces and therefore, often are highly decorated. The finely etched strapwork pattern on this example also is found on the best German firearms, edged weapons, and armor of the late sixteenth century. Before firing this dagger-pistol, the tip of the blade had to be removed, revealing the muzzle of the gun barrel.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Zoom Info
art-of-swords:

Combination of Dagger and Wheellock Pistol
Dated: circa 1575–1600
Culture: German
Place of Origin: possibly Saxony
Medium: steel, wood
Measurements: L. 18 15/16 in. (48.1 cm); L. of blade 13 13/16 in. (35.1 cm); L. of blade (without tip) 11 11/16 in. (29.7 cm); L. of quillons 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm); Cal. .29 in. (7.4 mm); Wt. 1 lb. 11 oz. (765.4 g)
Combination weapons usually were made as technical novelties and showpieces and therefore, often are highly decorated. The finely etched strapwork pattern on this example also is found on the best German firearms, edged weapons, and armor of the late sixteenth century. Before firing this dagger-pistol, the tip of the blade had to be removed, revealing the muzzle of the gun barrel.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Zoom Info
art-of-swords:

Combination of Dagger and Wheellock Pistol
Dated: circa 1575–1600
Culture: German
Place of Origin: possibly Saxony
Medium: steel, wood
Measurements: L. 18 15/16 in. (48.1 cm); L. of blade 13 13/16 in. (35.1 cm); L. of blade (without tip) 11 11/16 in. (29.7 cm); L. of quillons 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm); Cal. .29 in. (7.4 mm); Wt. 1 lb. 11 oz. (765.4 g)
Combination weapons usually were made as technical novelties and showpieces and therefore, often are highly decorated. The finely etched strapwork pattern on this example also is found on the best German firearms, edged weapons, and armor of the late sixteenth century. Before firing this dagger-pistol, the tip of the blade had to be removed, revealing the muzzle of the gun barrel.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Zoom Info

art-of-swords:

Combination of Dagger and Wheellock Pistol

  • Dated: circa 1575–1600
  • Culture: German
  • Place of Origin: possibly Saxony
  • Medium: steel, wood
  • Measurements: L. 18 15/16 in. (48.1 cm); L. of blade 13 13/16 in. (35.1 cm); L. of blade (without tip) 11 11/16 in. (29.7 cm); L. of quillons 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm); Cal. .29 in. (7.4 mm); Wt. 1 lb. 11 oz. (765.4 g)

Combination weapons usually were made as technical novelties and showpieces and therefore, often are highly decorated. The finely etched strapwork pattern on this example also is found on the best German firearms, edged weapons, and armor of the late sixteenth century. Before firing this dagger-pistol, the tip of the blade had to be removed, revealing the muzzle of the gun barrel.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Illustration WIP 2
Coffee, Fountain Pen, Mechanical Pencil, Sketchbook, Tea. To come: Owl, Octopus, iPhone, Headphones, bottom of a Lenovo Laptop, and maybe a mail opener in the shape of my spanish rapier.

Illustration WIP 2

Coffee, Fountain Pen, Mechanical Pencil, Sketchbook, Tea. 
To come: Owl, Octopus, iPhone, Headphones, bottom of a Lenovo Laptop, and maybe a mail opener in the shape of my spanish rapier.